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game list

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Our family loves games. We really love games. In fact, we’re a little game crazy. At last count we owned well over 100 board/card games! And we’ve got our eye on several more. Here is a list of some of our favorite games categorized by type and age. (Click on any game to purchase).

classic board games:
These games have stood the test of time for a reason. They are generally easy to play and work well for lighthearted family game nights. Most are more dependent on luck of the draw/roll/spin than on skill (though some have skill elements to them). These games work well for small children and for those who don’t enjoy the complexity of strategy games.

SMALL CHILDREN:

ELEMENTARY CHILDREN:

 

TWEENS/TEENS/ADULTS:

 

MIXED AGES:

  • Clue (We enjoy the classic, but we also really like the Harry Potter version.)

  • Life (So many versions of this game exist. We prefer the older ones, though we do like the Pirates of the Caribbean version.)

  • Sorry!

 

COOPERATIVE games:
Everyone works toward a common goal in these games and collaboration is encouraged, making them excellent for mixed ages or for those with a more sensitive nature. Listed easier to more difficult.
 

 

CARDS, DICE, & SUCH:
Cards, dice, tiles, marbles, etc. Most of these games are easy to learn and play and work well with mixed ages.
 

CARD GAMES:

(easier to harder)

 

DICE GAMES:

(easier to harder)

 

MARBLE GAMES:

(easier to harder)

 

TILE GAMES:

(easier to harder)

 

HYBRIDS:

(easier to harder)

 

 

DOMINATION GAMES:

These are all about getting the upper hand and gaining control of the board and/or the resources. Not recommended for smaller children. Listed easier to more difficult.
 


 

LIGHT STRATEGY GAMES:

These games provide a great introduction to the world of strategy games. Relatively easy to learn and play, they still have elements of strategy, logic, and/or deductive reasoning.

CHILDREN:

 

TEENS & ADULTS:

 

STRATEGY GAMES:
These are the real deal--the ones game geeks live for!
 

  • Agricola (Similar to Settlers of Catan but more complicated.)

  • Settlers of Catan (Several additions and/or alternate versions exist. We've played many of them and enjoyed them all.)

  • Splendor


 

 

STRATEGY CARD GAMES:

Though technically card based games, these rely on building a deck of cards that will achieve victory points at the end or on acquiring the right sequence of cards in order to win, making them a little more strategic than your typical card games. Not recommended for young children.
 


 

PARTY GAMES:

When you’ve got a lot of players and need a game to accommodate everyone.


 

TWO PLAYER GAMES:

Sometimes there are only a couple of people who want to play. No problem--these games are designed specifically for just two players!
 

EASY:

 

MORE CHALLENGING:

  • Checkers, Chess, Backgammon, and Cribbage (These classics never go out of style!)

  • Stratego

  • Rivals for Catan

  • Star Wars: X-Wing​

 
Solo games:

And sometimes there's only one--or you need to entertain a kiddo while waiting (in the car, at an appointment, while waiting for your help with homeschool). These are perfect!

 

Educational GAMES:

Games can add so much fun to your homeschooling or study plan. Half the time kids don't even realize their learning/studying, the other half of the time they don't care because they are having so much fun! Many of the games mentioned above can be used to teach "educational skills" such as math (e.g. any game involving counting or money), but these games in particular have added to our academic pursuits. I've categorized them by subject area, and tried to specify primary skill learned.

Geography:

 

language arts:

(Easier to Harder)

  • Apples to Apples Junior (vocabulary building & synonyms--Best with bigger groups)

  • Word on the Street Junior (spelling & vocabulary building-- A group game which means younger kids can play on teams with older kids who can spell--Youngers can come up with word ideas while older siblings or adults do the spelling.)

  • Last Letter (spelling, vocab, creative thinking which is a precursor to creative writing--About on par difficulty-wise with Word on the Street Junior, but the speed element makes it a bit trickier.)

 

Math:

(Easier to Harder)